A little holiday post

I’ve been having a couple of days off while my daughter was home from London.

One thing we did was a visit to Skipton Auction Mart (an old haunt where the band I play in, Dales Jam , rehearses) we went to see Flock to Skipton and Art in the Pen

There were a flock of decorated glass fibre sheep (Skipton means “Sheep Town”):

I think this was possibly my favourite:

Or possibly this one:

Or Baa Bones:

Art in the Pen was good too.  I’m thinking of exhibiting there next year.  Nearly bought a new hat, but resisted.

We had a walk round the village before Nim left for London.  I must say things are getting to look a little backendish, as we say round here:

Blackberries already (yum!)

Ash keys.

Hazel nuts. And rather a surprise for the canal bank:

These appear to be wild plums.  I’d seen a lot of blossom there in Spring.

It was a good sunny morning and some people were enjoying the scenery from their canal barge hotel (no, really an hotel!):

So warm the tups were sheltering from the sunshine (just when I was getting used to Summer being cold again!)

It’s that time of year again.

Beetroots are ready as well as windfall apples.  Early morning brewing and making marinated beetroot just go together.

Yesterday we went to  Yorkshire Sculpture Park near Wakefield.  There’s an excellent exhibition of David Nash’s sculpture.  It would normally be called a retrospective, except that there was a lot of new work and three massive butts called work in progress. I got really ‘in’ to his work:

First heard of him from Roger Deakin’s book “Wild Wood”  although David has been working since the seventies and there was a vast range of his work from very early work to very recent.  MASSIVE outdoor and indoor columns:

And small cars fit for toys for children.  Some fabulously inspiring work where greenwood works exploit the natural movement of wood as it dries and shrinks rather than fighting it or seeing it as a problem, which I spend a lot of time on at present.

YSP is a great place that we keep on coming back to over the years.  There is a big collection of Yorkshire’s own Henry Moore’s pieces set amidst an open landscape, as well as Antony Gormley, Andy Goldsworthy and many others.  The park is big, so accommodates lots of visitors well, although, it being wet yesterday, not too busy for our visit.  We had a good picnic outdoors between showers (at a rather ordinary PAR picnic bench) and managed a decent walk about too.  Took the bus to the Longside Gallery on the other side of the valley.  In there a lot of Nash’s work is collected, meant to be reminiscent of his Welsh workshop (but a little tidier from some of the photos I’ve seen).

These spoons caught my eye.

This is the Garden Gallery, I like the rolling indoor path and the mixture of wood and stone.  There is also a very muted colour scheme of white and grey that really lets the exhibits speak for themselves.

If you can – GO!

Details here