Snow and finish

Spot the bodgery.

snowy bodgeryWe’ve had about four inches of snow, which seems to be hanging around a bit.  It is not terribly cold, but this brings its own problems.  The snow was a bit soft yesterday and it started sticking to my clog soles.  The wooden, unsoled part in the middle welds to slightly damp snow, and then builds up, in the same way as how children roll large snow balls for snowmen.  Add a few shavings and pretty soon you’re a couple of inches taller, until one falls off and then your limping!

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I believe there is a dialect word for these clods of snow, but I’m blowed if I can find it.  Any ideas anyone?

We had the return of a little sun in the afternoon which was very welcome, it having been rather cloudy for many days.

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The last slab of the oak butt I milled attracted the attention of a cafe proprietor, so I’ve been working that up for a couple of food presentation boards with my usual knife-tooled finish.
SAMSUNG CSCIn the background you can see some progress on the green oak bench I’m working on.  It has a lower back than the last two.  I need to get the trailer down into the woods when the snow melts so I can level the legs in, the front two need taming a bit from their current wild splay.

Felling again today.  I have a new camera that takes pretty decent video – it looks really good on a big TV screen, but this extract is compressed for ease of downloading so quality is just ordinary.  Spot the inattention just before it finally goes down.  Tut, tut!  On this day that was the only tree to fall in one, all other three had to be hand winched down – I’m sparing you the endless video with a click, click, click sound track.

http://vimeo.com/58002252

Not wildly exciting.  Today (it took a little while to load up the video) I’ve been felling on the slopes above where the video was taken, rather more snow now, melting stuff.  Keeping a footing is rather important, and the escape route is vital.  I did a lot of dragging timber to the ride, and left some pieces long to fit on the Landy roof rack, I’m not taking the trailer in until the weather improves.  I got the Land Rover a little stuck last week and ended up winching a rock out of the way so I could get home.

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I leave the brash piles as shelter for wildlife.  Not that all wildlife is the forester’s friend:

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The top of this sycamore had been de-barked by squirrels, the upper one in a full ring and killed the lead growth.

 

 

Death to the trees – huh?

Many people do not appreciate why trees are cut down in managed woodland. From my point of view they are cut down to provide me with raw materials. From an environment perspective they are cut down for the benefit of woodland.

I work in a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a govt. designated area of land where development  and other activities are regulated.

On Monday I will be cutting down trees.  Here are some of them:

These are self-seeded sycamores.  Nothing wrong with that. Except that this is a SSSI.  With a management plan.  This is not wildwood.  There is none in England.  All woodland in England has been managed for hundreds, and in some cases thousands of years (OK more than 1,000 years is thousands – right?)

Strid Wood SSSI is so designated for these reasons:

“Ordnance Survey Sheet 1: 50,000: 104 1: 10,0000: SE 05 NE
First Notified: 1985 (December)
Other Information:

The south-west bank is intensively used for recreation, and nature trails have been set out.
Description:
Strid Wood contains the largest area of acidic oak woodland and the best remnant of oak wood-pasture in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The wood is set astride the River Wharfe which here runs through a deep steep-sided valley cut into Millstone Grit and Carboniferous Limestone.

The southwest bank has been much altered by forestry practice. The native oak Quercus petraea, and ash Fraxinus excelsior are accompanied by plantations of beech Fagus sylvatica, sycamore Acer pseudoplatanus, poplar Populus sp. and conifers such as larch and Douglas fir.
The very edge of the river however remains largely neutral, with elm and alders. Soil conditions on this side of the valley appear less acidic, and the ground flora is rich, with stands of dog’s mercury Mercurialis perennis, ramsons Allium ursinum, sanicle Sanicula europaea and sweet woodruff Asperula odoratum. The uncommon yellow star of Bethlehem Gagea lutea is found here.
The wood is valued by naturalists for its important populations of many groups of plants and animals. There is a rich bryophyte flora, several species being rare of very local in distribution, including Dicranum montanum, Cinclicotus mucronatus, Fissidens rufulus, Nowellia curvifolia and Sphagnum quinquefarium. A wide variety of fungi occur two species Coprinus subpurpureus and Deconica rhombispora, being first British records. Woodland management by selective felling rather than clear-felling has ensured a continuity of tree-cover, and has favoured the growth of a rich lichen-flora: indeed Strid Wood is considered one of the best lichen woods in Yorkshire.
Amongst the most notable species recorded are Arthonia didyma, Thelotrema lepadinum, Cladonia parasitica and Endocarpon pusillum. The wood is also noted for the occurrence of the local molluscs Acanthinula lamellata and Lauria anglica.

Over sixty species of birds have been recorded, forty-four of these breeding, including pied flycatcher, wood warbler and goosander.”

This is the designation by the Department of Environment Food and Rural Affairs.

OK so, ash and oak are the principal inhabitants, they are being encouraged and the invaders, mainly sycamore and beech are being discouraged (cut down).

Ash in Strid is a prolific generator and if left alone would produce a woodland of over crowded trees.  So what we do is remove some of the weaker trees, so that the small trees can become big healthy trees that will go forward for years (and centuries) to come.

Here are the marked men:

The little ones here are just taking the ground goodness and light away from the larger ash tree at centre right.  So the ones with the green spots will be cut, and the bigger ash will flourish.  This is not wild wood – the trees would be much bigger – it is managed woodland.  Enjoy.

Like the sunset: